Home Trending Medical Technology – Issue 11

Medical Technology – Issue 11

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Spanish health tech firm Avinent has purchased a 3D printer capable of producing multi-colour, multi-texture, multi-material models in a single print to expand its offering of anatomical and dental models for use in healthcare settings. We find out if this technology may be the future of surgical simulation and patient engagement.

Plus, we take a look at an innovative drug delivery robot designed to carry a therapeutic payload more than 100 times its own weight, explore the dangers of holding back on strong AI regulation in healthcare, and examine the potential of Google’s AI software, which is claimed to be able to detect late-stage breast cancer cells faster, and with more accuracy than pathologists.

Also in this issue, we profile the role of cybersecurity in the growing medical device market and find out how developments in brain-powered prosthetics could help to restore sensory feedback for users.

As always, we also round up the latest news from the medical device industry, and get comment and analysis from GlobalData’s healthcare analysts on market dynamics, product innovation, regional developments and regulatory issues.

In this issue

Form and function: a revolution in 3D-printed anatomical models
Spanish health tech firm Avinent has purchased a Stratasys J750 3D printer to expand its offering of anatomical and dental models for use in healthcare settings. The printer is able to print multi-colour, multi-texture, multi-material models in a single print, and could push forward the practice of using patient-specific anatomical prints to simulate and plan surgeries. Is this the future of surgical simulation and patient engagement?​​​​​​​ Chris Lo finds out.
Read more.

Very hungry caterpillar: soft-bodied robots to deliver drugs on target 
Researchers at City University Hong Kong have created a tiny, soft robot with caterpillar-like legs which can be directed using magnets to deliver drugs around the human body. Charlotte Edwards speaks to study co-author Haojian Lu to find out more about the research.
Read more.

AI in med tech: how should it be regulated?
In May, the FDA approved an innovative AI-driven algorithm to support clinical decision-making at the point of care. But, regulatory standards are only in the early stages; with FDA head Scott Gottlieb writing recently about setting transparent standards to accelerate the entry of AI advances into the med tech space. Sally Turner explores the dangers of holding back on strong AI regulation in healthcare, and what benefits could effective regulation provide.
Read more.

The technologies improving metastatic breast cancer detection
Google has developed a new AI system which is said to detect late-stage breast cancer cells faster, and with more accuracy than pathologists. With other technologies to improve breast cancer detection on the market, what will this influx mean for patients and practitioners? Charlotte Edwards reports.
Read more.

Safeguarding medical technology against cyberattacks
In the wake of serious data breaches and hacks targeting hospitals, the US Food and Drug Administration, in collaboration with Mitre, has released a new to help organisations prepare for a device breach. Sally Turner looks at the role of cybersecurity in the medical device market.
Read more.

The magic touch: bringing sensory feedback to brain-controlled prosthetics
Researchers at the University of Chicago are leading a project to introduce the sense of touch to the latest brain-controlled prosthetic arms. Adding sensory feedback to already-complex neuroprosthetics is a towering task, but offers the chance to radically transform the lives of amputees and people living with paralysis. Chris Lo reports.
Read more.

Next issue preview

A team at San Diego State University is using advanced computerised comprehension tasks to detect language problems in children. We speak to the researchers to find out how the program could lead to significant improvements for conditions that often hamper a child’s progress. Plus, we explore whether democratising data could be the key to providing better healthcare.

Also in this issue, we find out how researchers are using machine-learning to aid critical decisions in sepsis care, get an insight into the past and future of MRI with Avingtrans, examine a high-tech approach to identifying biomarkers for autism spectrum disorder, and profile the legacy of innovator and Medtronic founder Earl Bakken.

The post Medical Technology – Issue 11 appeared first on Verdict Medical Devices.

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